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The best places to buy a vacation home in Georgia

The Peach State has some incredible destinations for vacation homes – enjoy luscious scenery and plenty of extra rental income

Historic houses around Forsyth Park, downtown Savannah, GA.
(Image credit: Daniela Duncan/ Getty)

The best places to buy a vacation home in Georgia offer real estate investors a great range of attractions, from graceful towns to amazing nature spots with hiking trails, and even wine tasting opportunities. Georgia has it all: mountains, coast, city – and is not nearly as expensive as many other comparable locations. And the climate is hot and subtropical, making it a great year-round destination. 

Discover where and how to buy a house in Georgia, as recommended by top real estate agents with knowledge of the state.

1. The best place to buy a vacation home in Georgia: Savannah

Savannah, GA, towntown skyline

(Image credit: Sean Pavone / Alamy Stock Photo)

Savannah is gorgeous – and instantly recognizable from the many images of its antebellum tree-lined streets. Enjoy a ride in a horse-drawn carriage, a wander around its cobblestone squares, or a trip to the beach just outside the city. 

Rick Abbiati, realtor and owner of Colony Buys Houses names Savannah as his favorite without hesitation: 'Savannah is number one. Savannah, Georgia is located right next to the ocean, has beautiful historic architecture with a mix of all the modern amenities, and a low cost of living. Savannah is the hidden gem of Georgia!'

The typical home price in this beautiful city is only $210,331, making it highly affordable for vacation home investors. 

2. Blue Ridge: the breathtaking mountain location

View from Popcorn Overlook, Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia, USA

(Image credit: John Eccles / Alamy Stock Photo)

If it's the spectacular mountains in the the state's north you're after, Blue Ridge should be first on your radar. UpNest's CEO, Simon Ru, highly recommends Blue Ridge 'for your best return on investment. With a median listing price under $500K, you can still find an affordable property with high rental value. It's got fantastic nature at Chattahoochee National Forest, offering mountain views and more.'

Richard Latimer, CEO of Veritas Buyers, agrees, adding that Blue Ridge will fetch you a median rental value of $47,042. 

He also points out that it's the perfect tourist destination: 'On Evolve's list, the town debuted at No. 2. Visitors enjoy the Chattahoochee National Forest's trails and waterfalls, or ride the Blue Ridge Scenic Railway to the nearby mountain towns of McCaysville and Copperhill, making your vacation rental the ideal home base for a variety of dreamy day trips.'

3. Dahlonega: for wine lovers

Main Square, Dahlonega, North Georgia, USA

(Image credit: Ian Dagnall / Alamy Stock Photo)

A wine destination in Georgia? Oh yes, and it's as pretty as a picture, with most wine tasting centering around the town's historic square. Simon points out that Dahlonega 'is even more affordable [than Blue Ridge], with listings available under $300K. While rental incomes won't be quite as Blue Ridge, Dahlonega is especially popular at Christmastime.'

4. Marietta: the town with unique history

Historic mill and waterfall in Marietta, Georgia

(Image credit: Robert Hainer/Getty)

If you live near Atlanta and want somewhere near the city, but with a relaxed vacation vibe, Marietta is not to be missed. Martin Orefice, the Founder of Rent To Own Labs, explains the Atlanta suburb's appeal: 'The town has a unique
history and you can be a part of exciting tours such as the Ghost of
Marietta and Black Heritage walking tours. Home values increase at an
average rate of 7.1 percent year by year. Plus, the average rent is $1332 and home
values stand at $292,000. Marietta promises a great ROI if you’re planning
to invest.'

What will it be? A scenic spot in the Blue Ridge mountains, or a heritage home in one of Georgia's perfect historic towns?

Anna Cottrell

Anna Cottrell is Consumer Editor across Future Plc Home titles. She has a background in academic research and is the author of London Writing of the 1930s. She writes about interior design, property, and gardening.