Inside Karl Lagerfeld's fascinating Monaco apartment– 'with decor seemingly lifted straight out of a comic strip'

The designer's pied-à-terre is a modern fever dream

Karl Lagerfeld In the photo studio at the back of the 7L bookshop, Rue de Lille, Paris, 2008.
In the photo studio at the back of the 7L bookshop, Rue de Lille, Paris, 2008.
(Image credit: A. Schorr / ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Karl Lagerfeld's legacy in the world of fashion is unrivaled. His highly curated public persona and look have made him one of the most documented and photographed designers of all time. However, as Patrick Mauriès points out in his new book with Marie Kalk, little attention has been paid to Karl's homes, even though he 'changed his decor even more often than his image' (Mauriès 7).

Until now, that is. Karl's home decor will be explored extensively in the highly anticipated retrospective on his homes: Karl Lagerfeld: A Life in Houses by Patrick Mauriès and Marie Kalk, available in January 2024 in the US, and December 7th in the UK. The book dives into the history of each of Lagerfeld's homes, exploring the furniture put together by some of the best interior designers and artists of the time.

Karl Lagerfeld at the Unknown table by George Sowden, with Riviera chairs by Michele De Lucchi.

Karl Lagerfeld at the Unknown table by George Sowden, with Riviera chairs by Michele De Lucchi.

(Image credit: Photograph © Jacques Schumacher)

One of our absolute favorite homes discussed in the book is Le Roccabella; Lagerfeld's dream-like pied-à-terre in Monaco. According to A Life in Houses, Karl took up residence in an apartment on the 21st floor of the luxury block designed by Gio Ponti in 1918.

A reverse view of the sitting room, with Masanori Umeda’s boxing ring and George Sowden’s armchair in the foreground.

A reverse view of the sitting room, with Masanori Umeda’s boxing ring and George Sowden’s armchair in the foreground.

(Image credit: Photograph © Jacques Schumacher)

There, he began a fascinating collection of art and furniture from the radical Memphis Group, known for their celebration of 'color, geometric forms, and, above all, humor in decoration' (Kalk 76). Lagerfeld instantly fell in love. The eccentric designer bought their entire first collection for his apartment in Monaco. 

He stated: 'This furniture is like nothing else. It is perfect for Monaco,' a place, 'without a past' (76). Andrée Putman, the French interior designer, who worked on the refurbishment of the home described Karl's apartment as a 'palace for a child' while Kalk states that 'the decor is seemingly lifted straight out of a comic strip' (76).

Lagerfeld's candy-colored, postmodern dreamscape certainly lives up to its reputation. The colorful rooms are at once incredibly chic while also feeling otherworldly. They are a masterclass in how interior design can be an art form.


To see inside all 13 of the homes where Karl lived, you're just going to have to wait for the book to come out. In the meantime, our list of interior design trends is a great starting point for interior design inspiration.

Sophie Edwards
News Writer

I am a London-based News Writer at Homes & Gardens. My interests lie at the intersection of design and popular culture with a particular focus on trends and celebrity homes. Before joining Future, I worked as a Content Writer and Communications Lead for Fig Linens and Home, a luxury linens and home interiors brand based in Fairfield County, CT. I have a BA in Creative Writing from Sarah Lawrence College in New York and an MSc from the Oxford University Department of Anthropology.