Interior Design

White Christmas trees are the alternative trend taking over the festive season

The kitsch classic has become this year’s most wanted look

White Christmas Tree in a white living roomliving
(Image credit: Cox & Cox)

In a year where green prevails in all areas of the home, we’re looking for an alternative color in our Christmas trees. 

Yes, interior design experts have observed a nostalgic twist on the festive staple as white trees are set to be one of the biggest Christmas tree trends of the moment. But are you ready to make the shift? 

Evoking purity and cleanliness alongside confidence and sophistication, white is a wonderfully versatile color for the holiday season. Here, designers discuss if this bold trend is just a passing fad or if white Christmas trees are here to stay. 

White Christmas Tree in a white living roomliving


(Image credit: Cox & Cox)
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A recent study* revealed that white trees are the most popular Christmas decoration idea of the year – following a combined total of 2,566,517 appearances across Pinterest, Instagram, and TikTok. But why are they in demand this year?

According to Dani Taylor, Product & Creative Director at Cox & Cox (opens in new tab), the appeal comes from its versatility. 

‘A white tree is the perfect blank canvas for your Christmas look, whether you choose to go for a boho vibe with neutral baubles and pampas grasses, or bright and playful with blush baubles and lots of lights,’ she says. 

Remember, texture in interior design is vital, especially if you want to avoid a stark or clinical aesthetic this season. Quite simply, without texture, white decor will fall flat. It's crucial to look at the room as a whole and bring an area together with mixed materials for vibrancy and warmth.

White Christmas Tree in a white living roomliving

(Image credit: Cox & Cox)
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If you think white Christmas tree ideas are only reserved for ultra-modern homes, think again. Surprisingly, a white decorating scheme will work regardless of your style of home. 

Plus, while the color works in interiors of all styles, Dani suggests that a white Christmas tree offers the ‘best of both worlds.' This is because you can experiment with an alternative Christmas tree but still maintain the tradition through its shape – and enjoy lots of scope for dressing. ‘The white tree really glows when you add string lights, and the neutral color works with virtually any trend,’ she adds. 

Similarly, Jen Derry, the EVP of Product Merchandising at tree company Balsam Hill (opens in new tab) notes a trend of bringing ‘the snowy days of Christmas indoors,’ meaning white decorations (especially when paired against other whites) will be a huge trend this year. 

White Christmas Tree in a white living roomliving

(Image credit: Balsam Hill)

Jemma Baskeyfield, the Company Historian at Burleigh (opens in new tab), also adds that she too is prioritizing one color in her Christmas decorations – whether that’s the color in question – or another green alternative. She recommends using the one tone throughout all your festive decorations, including the cutlery, fabrics, and candle holders.

This is the white living room idea we never expected to see on this side of the millennium, but it’s one we expect to endure for holidays to come. 

*New study (opens in new tab) by Confused.com 

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.