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These 5 designers are high on our watch list this London Craft Week

The festival of creativity has launched in London – but we expect these individuals will make waves in homes worldwide

Geoffrey Preston designed room at London Craft Week
(Image credit: Geoffrey Preston)

Fashion Week and London’s Design Festival may have concluded, but another festival of creativity is only just getting started. 

From yesterday 4th October, to this Sunday, 10th, 200 locations around the capital will celebrate the best in British and international creativity – and set interior design trends for the season ahead. 

As a melting pot of upcoming interior designers, textiles, and furniture brands, there is no doubt that our homes will feel the repercussions of London Craft Week. But who do you need to remember? Here are five stand-outs on our watch list. 

1. Freya Bramble-Carter – Ceramics 

Freya Bramble Carter at London Craft Week

(Image credit: Freya Bramble Carter )

Few ceramics possess the power of those created by Freya Bramble-Carter – a design guru whose work celebrates the beauty of the natural world. 

Freya’s ideology centers around her identity as a black female artist with a loud voice – which she exhibits through her strong and beautiful designs. She aims to bring a source of energy to the home – around her London workshop and further afield. Watch out for Freya; she might just reshape your dining table decor ideas for 2022. 

2. Geoffrey Preston – Plaster & Stucco  

Geoffrey Preston

(Image credit: Geoffrey Preston)

As one of the UK’s top architectural sculptors, Geoffrey Preston’s presence at London Craft Week is hardly a surprise. However, the festival is offering Geoffrey international limelight on his most recent work. 

The exhibition in question consists of plasterwork – with an emphasis on floral sculpture and draws inspiration, in particular flowers and leaves from the 18th century.  

3. Max Bainbridge – Artist & Sculptor 

Max Bainbridge at London Craft Week

(Image credit: Max Bainbridge)

Celebrated sculptor Max Bainbridge has collaborated with Forest + Found and artist  Abigail Booth to create the living room furniture idea your home needs. 

The partnership showcases Max's ethical approach to material and craft – using the natural shape of wood as a starting point to create contemporary pieces that are reflective of the making process. Highlights include these Cedar Moon Jars (above) that combine natural beauty with a modern style stamp. 

4. Mac Collins – Interiors 

Mac Collins at London Craft Week

(Image credit: Mac Collins)

With his European and Scandinavian approach to furniture making – and contextual inspiration from his Caribbean and African heritage – Mac Collins is one of the most upcoming designers of London Craft Week – and all for a good reason. 

For the festival, Mac has teamed up with FLOOR_STORY to create two exquisite hand-crafted rugs that will inspire your living room rug ideas and fill your scheme with undisputed style. 

5. Ellen Mae Williams – Textiles 

Ellen Mae Williams

(Image credit: Ellen Mae Williams)

Knowing how to mix patterns in a room is one thing, but knowing where to find the best designs is another. Enter Ellen Mae Williams, a master of textiles, which she designs using natural dyes and hand-painted linen fabrics. Sustainability is similarly important to Ellen, who uses traditional textile methods to create contemporary pieces that will enrich both traditional and modern homes. 

To mark London Craft Week, Ellen has teamed up with homeware store The Edition 94, who will release her unique collection of naturally dyed textiles.

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc's Homes titles. She has a background in national newspapers in the UK and has experience in fashion and travel journalism, which she previously practised whilst living in Paris and New York City. Her adoration for these fashion capitals means she particularly enjoys writing about upcoming styles and trends for Homes & Gardens. Megan also loves discovering vintage pieces in her spare time, meaning her decor is largely influenced by the beauty of the jazz age.