News

Lilac is trending – experts suggest this color could help you sleep better

Designers and doctors love this neutral alternative – here's why you should bring it into the bedroom

Lilac bedroom
(Image credit: Crown)

Trend forecaster WGSN recently declared lavender will be the Color of the Year for 2023, but a similar shade is set to make headlines – in ways beyond its aesthetic. While lilac is predicted to dominate paint trends this season, this hue is making waves in the bedroom, where experts have revealed that this tone may improve your sleeping pattern. 

If you're looking for tips on how to sleep better, the key could be in your bedroom color ideas – and this emerging trend is at the peak of the expert-approved tones. 

Lilac bedroom

(Image credit: Crown)

Lavender and lilac shades are subtle enough to be used as the main wall colors in a room (as a fun alternative to white, gray, or beige). But no room showcases lilac's qualities quite like the bedroom. 

'Lilac is traditionally a romantic and feminine hue but is increasingly popular for many rooms in the home thanks to its subtlety and adaptability,' says Dominic Myland, the CEO of paint label Mylands (opens in new tab).

'We're noticing more and more customers choosing lilac for their interiors because it adds a pop of color but isn't overwhelming or intimidating like other, bolder shades, and its versatile nature means it pairs well with a myriad of colors.'

Why you should bring lilac into the bedroom – according to the experts 

Lilac bedroom

(Image credit: Crown)

According to sleep specialist and the owner of Bed Guru (opens in new tab) Carl Walsh, the power behind the color trend comes down to your hormones, that consequently affect your sleep schedule. 

"Our brains collect information from our surroundings and translate it into chemical signals, releasing different hormones in response,' Carl begins. 'In this instance, melatonin and cortisol are the hormones that control your sleep cycle. That's why it's good to consider what colors you're using in the bedroom to ensure your brain is telling your body to release the right hormones to put your body into a sleepy state. 

The expert suggests that lilac and similar 'softer colors' are known for their soothing qualities that promote good quality sleep. 'Lilac specifically is also associated with hope and optimism, so it is good for alleviating feelings of stress and anxiety before heading off to sleep,' he says.

Lilac bedroom

(Image credit: Crown)

The expert is not alone in his admiration for this non-stimulating bedroom idea. Dr. Giuseppe Aragona, a GP and online doctor for OnlinePrescriptionDoctor (opens in new tab), similarly praises lilac's ability to send you into a peaceful slumber – adding that it will promote 'promote feelings of calm [and] happiness' before you sleep. 

'This may also be because the plant Lavender, which is famous for its relaxing and calming smell and mood-boosting properties, is lilac or purple in color, proving that it is all linked and is often psychological,' Dr. Aragona explains. He adds that, alongside the bedroom, lilac is an equally effective home office idea – thanks to its ability to fight 'feelings of stress.'

So, you may have already invested in the best mattress – but a good night's sleep comes down to the right color palette. This season, we're choosing the tone that's set to be the most fashionable for a long time to come. 

Megan Slack
News Editor

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.