Interior Design

Athena Calderone reveals 3 essential steps to rug buying – as she launches her new collection

The celebrated interior designer sits down with H&G to share the flooring secret that will elevate your home

Athena Calderone designed rug in a hallway
(Image credit: Resolute - Taupe by Simon Watson)

Athena Calderone has the secret to an effortless scheme, and it begins with the floor. The interior designer has collaborated with Moroccan rug company Beni Rugs to create Broken Symmetry – a collection of 12 geometric staples that will add an escapist aesthetic to your interiors.

The new collection offers a selection of patterns that reflect the harmonic and disharmonic cadence of shapes, tones, and textures through their beautiful imperfections. 

However, before you invest, Athena urges you to take time out to forward-plan – and follow the process she uses in her own home. This is how to choose a rug, the Athena Calderone way. 

1. Map out the size and shape

Restraint in Sage by Athena Calderone

Restraint in Sage by Athena Calderone

(Image credit: Restraint - Sage by Simon Watson)
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'It might feel like an extra step, but you should always take the time to measure and tape out the exact size of the rug on your floor,' Athena explains when planning modern hallway flooring ideas

'This is unbelievably helpful in visualizing how much area the rug will take up and where your existing furniture will sit within that framework. It's also especially important before purchasing Moroccan rugs as they can tend to be oddly shaped.' 

Restraint by Athena Calderone (opens in new tab), $602 at Benirugs

Among the most beautifully imperfect of these rugs is Restraint (opens in new tab) in sage (above) – our favorite colorway. 

Fawn in seasonal yellow (below) is the answer to your fall decor ideas (opens in new tab), with a rustic allure that will endure throughout all seasons. 

2. Ask for a sample of yarn

Restraint in Fawn by Athena Calderone

Restraint in Fawn by Athena Calderone

(Image credit: Restraint - Fawn by Simon Watson)
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After mapping the space, Athena reveals she often asks the vendor for a color sample when planning living room rug ideas .

'If it's a new rug, consider asking the vendor for a color sample of the yarn. They should be able to send one so you can see the color with the other fabrics in the room against the wall color and the light,' Athena recommends. 

3. Check the lighting with photos

Athena Calderone inspired hallway

Resolute by Athena Calderone

(Image credit: Resolute - Taupe by Simon Watson)
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When decorating with pattern in a naturally lit room, Athena also suggests '[taking] photos at various times of the day so you can track how the rug looks in the room based on the light.'

'This step is so important because the light refracts differently throughout the day and has the potential to change the look and feel of the space entirely,' she adds. 

Gambit in sage in hallway by Athena Calderone

Gambit in sage by Athena Calderone

(Image credit: Gambit - Sage by Simon Watson)
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Now we're fully equipped to shop the Broken Symmetry (opens in new tab) collection; the only thing left to do is pre-plan before an inevitable purchase. You can shop the collection below.  

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.