News

Painting your front door this color could add $6,500 to your house value – say experts

Real estate experts discuss the power of black – and how it could boost your saleability, instantly

Black front door
(Image credit: Alamy)

Your choice in paint and your curb appeal are both influential in their own right – but what happens when you combine their power together? You can elevate your house price by thousands, according to those in the know.

Considering front door ideas in relation to the eternally-evolving trove of color trends available, it can be hard to know where to begin when making your home more sellable. However, experts have suggested that a traditional shade, usually associated with power, is what can boost house value.

Black front doors are the most popular of front door color ideas amongst real estate professionals who suggest that this timeless tone could raise your property's value by up to $6,500. Here's what you need to know about this ever-popular front door pick.

Why do black doors add value to your home?

Glossy black front door surrounded by foliage

(Image credit: GettyImages)

'The number one front door color that buyers will pay more for is black. A black door with a shiny finish may sell for up to $6,500 more than a similar house with a different colored door. It is also the top searched front door color,' says Kerry Sherin, consumer advocate at home valuation company, Ownerly

If you're researching 'what adds the most curb appeal', you are likely to hear a lot about the power of a front door. However, as Kerry explains, a black front door has the ability to simultaneously improve your curb appeal – and your house value. 

'Curb appeal is always an important factor when it comes to selling a home. It is estimated that depending on the color of your front door, your home can sell anywhere from around $900 - $6,500 more than similar homes in the area,' she says. 'Black gives a higher-end look to a home.'

fall front door decor, hand tied eucalyptus bouquets

(Image credit: Future)

'If you want to increase your home's value, painting the front door is one of the easiest ways to do so,' the expert adds. 

If you don't want to paint your door black, the expert suggests that slate blue and olive green are also known to add value to a home. 

And Kerry is not exclusive in her observations. Colour psychologist and Lick's director of interior design, Tash Bradley, explains that your front door plays a 'huge part on how you feel and interact within your space', so if you're selling your home, you need to ensure it evokes the right emotion. She also describes the color as 'elegant, classic, mysterious' and adds that it showcases a 'strong sense of style.' 

'Colors are a powerful way of delivering emotion, and selecting the right color can really make an impact and tell a story about what's to come inside,' she adds. 

Front door with brown door and lighting

(Image credit: Joy Coakley / Mary Jo Fiorella)

So, while it seems that decorating with black has its benefits inside the home, it's equally important (or maybe, even more important) to bring this color to your exterior, too.

'First impressions count. In fact, most buyers will make a decision in the first few seconds of seeing your home about whether they want to see inside. That’s why an inviting entrance is [the] key to maximizing the sale price of your property,' adds Polly Ogden Duffy, the managing director at John D Wood & Co real estate agents. 'It also helps to secure viewings of your home, ultimately giving you the strongest chance to secure the best price for your property.'

Megan Slack
News Editor

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.