People are blowing cinnamon on their front doors – wellness experts explain why

This ritual is a routine for many every month – here's what it means for their homes – according to those who know

large modern home in the hamptons
(Image credit: Mary Patton Design / Molly Culver Photography)

The start of a new month is often a period of change – both great and small. If you're going to start a new project, job, or routine, you're likely to begin on this date – but it has a deeper meaning for your home, too. 

While it may seem surprising that there is a correlation between your front door ideas and the first day of the month – the two are, in fact, related. But it has nothing to do with pest control as you might initially expect. Instead, spiritual figures and wellness experts explain that the ritual has a meaning beyond your exterior – and in your home – where you will experience the cinnamon's effects. 

Here's what the ancient process involves and why the experts practise it in their exteriors. 

What does blowing cinnamon at your front door do?

'The reason we blow cinnamon into the home at the start of the month is that this marks the beginning of a new cycle, so it is the perfect opportunity for new, positive beginnings,' says May Shorrock, a Spiritual Wellness Expert at Burnt Beech (opens in new tab).

Using cinnamon in your soil

(Image credit: Alamy)

The expert explains that many people choose to blow cinnamon through their front door to 'attract abundance and prosperity throughout their entire home – and this ritual has stood the test of time. Cinnamon has been used for thousands of years in wealth-attracting rituals, so it has a lot of historical backing in this respect,' she says.

And she is not alone in her observations. Charlotte Bailey, an Esoteric Expert and Metaphysical Practitioner from Typically Topical (opens in new tab), similarly reinforces its power, adding that the metaphysical practice represents a gateway between our internal and outer world. 

'By blowing it across the door, we’re inviting prosperity and abundance to cross from the outer world into our home, aka the internal world,' she says. 

So, while many people enjoy the spice's benefits in their cooking and garden (using cinnamon in soil is a great way to deter gnats, for example), it has a deeper, time-honored meaning for others, too. 

Using cinnamon in your soil

(Image credit: GettyImages)

What is cinnamon ritual?

The ritual is as simple as the experts suggest – it involves simply blowing the spice over your front door. However, while it is common to do so on the first day of a month, Charlotte explains that you can practise it at any point of the calendar. 

'This abundance can take the form of any good news: a new career, a job promotion, a sudden financial windfall, or a new connection,' she says. 'Though, as with any spiritual routine, it’s the belief behind the practice that matters most. If you don’t believe in its ability to attract prosperity, you’ll never see it.'

Therefore, while the process will not make your front door more attractive in any way, it may improve the energy in your home  – especially when paired with correct entryway feng shui teachings. 

Is cinnamon toxic to cats?

If you're living with pets, you may inevitably want to follow this ritual with caution. May refers to the ASPCA (opens in new tab) who suggests that cinnamon is non-toxic to cats – but it's still worth taking extra care around any animal. 

'As a pet owner myself, I always prefer to exercise caution during these types of rituals and remove pets from the vicinity of powerful aromatics,' she says. 

Megan Slack
News Editor

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.