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Why you should hang mirrors over your fireplaces – urges a Feng Shui expert

Here’s how to turn the mirror above your fireplace into a positive tool – to amplify good energy around your space

Living room with pale grey walls, bay window, built in storage either side of the chimney breast and fireplace. Grey rug and sofa and orange patterned armchairs.
(Image credit: Davide Lovatti)

The appeal of a mirror, and its relationship to interior design, needs no introduction. This essential element is a feature interiors experts use relentlessly to reflect light around a room – and to make a space feel larger. 

But what do experts say about the impact of a mirror in terms of Feng Shui? 

Whether you have a fireplace in the bedroom – or you're learning more about living room feng shui – experts have shared that putting a mirror above your fireplace is one of the most powerful things you can do to impact the energy of your space. 

When used correctly, they say, putting a mirror above your fireplace can fill your room with positivity. Here's why – and how to amplify its features.

How does putting a mirror over a fireplace affect a space?

Living room with decorated coving, parquet flooring and fireplace. Large mirror over the mantelpiece, blue soft furnishings and animal skin rug.

(Image credit: Ti Archive)

Simply put, putting a mirror over a fireplace can improve a room's chi (positive) energy; this, in turn, makes for a more harmonius and welcoming space.

Melissa Waite Stamps (opens in new tab), a member of the International Feng Shui Guild, explains that, in Feng Shui, there are five elements: wood, fire, earth, water, and metal. 'One of the intentions in Feng Shui is to create a harmonious flow of energy between elements and qualities of Chi,' she says. 'Chi can be expressed in infinite ways, qualities, elements, colors, seasons of the year, Yin and Yang expressions, and other ways.' 

It is the impact of the different elements and Chi that makes this mirror placement so powerful. 

'A mirror is usually associated with the element of Water, which has to do with mystery, emotion, career, wealth, and the flow of business and commerce,' Melissa says. 

Meanwhile, the fireplace is (perhaps unsurprisingly) associated with the Fire element. 'Fire is creative, expansive; if burning too hot can burn itself and others. It is magnetic and compelling, self-expressive, and essential to life.'

traditional style neutral living room with beige walls, fireplace, chandelier and green sofa

(Image credit: Brent Darby)

In the teaching, Fire and Water elements usually conflict with one another. However, while this may initially sound problematic in terms of mirror ideas, Melissa explains there is nothing negative about putting one above your fireplace.

'With a deeper understanding of Feng Shui and the elements, you can work with the Chi to create positive outcomes. You want to amplify positive features,' she says. 

But what do you need to know?

How to style your mirror above your fireplace – to accentuate positive energy

white bathroom with pink marble shower with gold enclosure

(Image credit: Future/ Paul Raeside)

Whether you're working with your living room, dining room, or bedroom Feng Shui – the secret to styling mirrors above your fireplace remains the same. Melissa urges you to reflect plants, flowers, or trees (where possible) in the reflection to 'feed' the element of Fire and improve the Creative Cycle.

If you have a mirror above a fireplace in the Career Gua (the center third of the front of your home) and it reflects your garden trees or garden, then it symbolizes the element of Water feeding the element of Wood (trees, plants, and flowers),' the expert explains. 'The Wood feeds the element of Fire. This is part of the Creative Cycle.'

If you are unable to reflect trees in your mirror, you can still achieve a similar effect by investing in the correct Feng Shui plants. Melissa recommends putting two curly bamboo plants or flowers in front of the mirror so that the energy of Wood is doubled by the mirror's reflection. This will create a similar cure. 

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.