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Cabincore – the dark design trend that experts are bringing into their homes

This interiors movement exhibits a winter aesthetic – but it will dominate trends this springtime

Chalet with Cabincore look
(Image credit: Humbert & Poyet - Chalet GSTAAD / ©Francis Amiand)

Springtime is often associated with floral prints and soft pastels, but a new design movement is changing the way we celebrate this season in our home. 

Introducing Cabincore, the new interior design trend that romanticizes cabin life through warm textiles, layered lighting, and richly-hued accessories that will bring Apline beauty into your space – wherever that may be. 

This decorating idea first originated on social media, but it is already making waves amongst designers – some of whom experiment with the style in their own homes. Here’s how to bring the best of Cabincore into your scheme, the expert-approved way. 

What is Cabincore?  

Chalet with Cabincore look

(Image credit: DESIGNWILKES / © John Sinal Photography)

Cabincore originated on TikTok as Cottagecore’s darker sibling. In contrast to Cottagecore’s focus on gingham prints and rustic accents, Cabincore pays tribute to mountainous locations through faded paint ideas (think olive, terracotta, and rusty tones), ornate embroidery, and a considerable amount of wood. 

How to incorporate Cabincore – with a sophisticated twist 

Chalet with Cabincore look

(Image credit: DESIGNWILKES / © John Sinal Photography)

‘As a Canada native, I appreciate the Cabincore aesthetic with a high-end and sophisticated twist,’ says Jeffrey Wilkes, the Founder of DESIGNWILKES. The designer recently completed two cabin projects on the remote Mayne Island off the coast of Vancouver as a home for him and his partner. 

‘Throughout the interiors, we created a cozy, cabin-like feel as the floors, walls, and ceilings all have wood paneling,’ Jeffery explains. ‘We incorporated exposed ceiling beams and a wood stove in the living room, two main features contributing to the coziness and sophisticated look of the space.’ The final result (above) epitomizes Cabincore without appearing gimmicky. 

‘Incorporating textures such as velvet and leather upholstery – as well as carefully-curated color choices throughout – can also help achieve the Cabincore look,’ Jeffrey adds. 

Chalet with Cabincore look

(Image credit: Humbert & Poyet - Chalet GSTAAD / ©Francis Amiand)

Emil Humbert and Christophe Poyet, the designers behind the Swiss chalet above, explain that you can achieve an elegant Cabincore look by avoiding clichés. 

‘Wood adds warmth and texture, but we also blended it with noble metals to form a clean, graphic contrast,’ they say. ‘The result is a juxtaposition of materials that respect the identity of the building – the traditional architectural codes of the chalet are maintained, yet the interior eagerly responds to a more modern design.’

Chalet with Cabincore look

(Image credit: Humbert & Poyet - Chalet GSTAAD / ©Francis Amiand)

We're rushing to replicate the Cabincore aesthetic this springtime – because who says ski cabins are for winter only?

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Homes & Gardens and Livingetc. As a News Writer, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.