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The Property Brothers urge renovators to choose this trend-setting countertop finish – and we're on board

Design duo Jonathan and Drew Scott favor this unexpected finish (in some cases) – here's how it can elevate your kitchen

Property Brothers
(Image credit: GettyImages)

Brothers Drew and Jonathan Scott are design authorities in their own right – but together, they are an unmatched power in the rebuilding and renovating industry. 

The pair, best known for fronting W Network's Property Brothers, have elevated fixer-uppers into stylish new homes over the past decade and – of course – transforming a kitchen is among the most impactful ways to make a notable change. 

While many features contribute to the perfect kitchen, countertop ideas are among the most influential decisions you can make – so it's only natural to follow kitchen trends that you know look good. And, while there is certainly nothing wrong with following ideas with widespread approval, the Property Brothers urge you to widen your horizons to kitchen ideas that are slightly more unique. 

For many, a shiny, glossy countertop is the go-to option (and we can see why, because this finish is beautiful in its own right). However, in an episode of the Property Brothers (named It Takes a Village), Jonathan and Drew suggest going for a quartz countertop that 'doesn't have to have a polished look.' 

Instead, the brothers chose a honed finish (similar to the one below) that has a rare matte aesthetic that differs from the conventional.  

Property Brothers

(Image credit: Caesarstone)

To know what color countertop is best for a kitchen, it's essential to define the difference between those honed (and approved by The Property Brothers) and those with a polished finish. 

Honed countertops are defined as stone slab that has been ground to a smooth and consistent surface. This creates a distinct matte look that is (almost) velvety-to-the-touch – and that differentiates from the finishes we're so used to seeing (and still love to see) elsewhere. 

Plus, while The Property Brothers' approval is more than enough to convince us to consider a honed finish – it's good to know that those in the kitchen industry are equally admiring of this less-conventional finish. 

Caesarstone (opens in new tab)’s head of design, Mor Krisher, says that, in recent months, the brand has seen an increase in the number of customers who are opting for matte textures and more industrial concrete finishes. He adds that these options 'are great at adding depth and texture to plain walls or modern and sleek cabinetry.'

Property Brothers

(Image credit: Caesarstone)

'Countertops made with matte quartz, honed porcelain, and concrete give your surface a deep, earthy appearance that feels very organic,' Mor adds. He explains that honed surfaces look great in spaces 'that capitalize upon warm tones to create a nature-inspired design' – which is something to consider when thinking about your kitchen color ideas, too. 

'These countertops do not reflect as much light as glossy quartz. Because of this, many homeowners like to add matte surfaces into kitchens with an abundance of light as they have less reflective glare, allowing them to mask food spills and messes more easily,' Mor says. 

We're more than ready to give honed finishes a try. 

Megan Slack
News Editor

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.