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The Salone del Mobile 2022 trends that will reshape our kitchens

These kitchen features caught our attention at the world's biggest furniture fair – here's why you need to know about them

Kitchen at Salone del Mobile 2022
(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

Salone del Mobile – The Milan Furniture Fair – has championed design in Italy’s style capital for 61 years, and 2022 is no exception. The festival, which will run until June 12th, is back with a bang after a three-year hiatus because of the pandemic – and people are more excited than ever. Amongst them was team H&G who were there to observe the latest furniture designs and developments.

This year it was the Eurocucina fair, which alternates every other year with the Euroluce lighting fair. The event was a trove of kitchen innovations that we expect to reshape kitchen trends of the future. 

These, from a pop-up pantry hidden within a kitchen island to a beautifully hand-painted oven, are what stood out.

These are the trends H&G’s editors spotted at this year’s fair – and why you need to know about them, wherever you are.

1. Poliform's hidden retractable countertop pantry

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

Italian kitchen manufacturer Poliform (opens in new tab) is renowned for its ability to create beautiful kitchens that are incredibly practical, too.

Their latest innovation is a pop-up pantry (pictured above, hidden in the worksurface, and below, revealed). It exemplifies how to use space cleverly and create a streamlined scheme without sacrificing function – and it’s a feature that will revolutionize pantry ideas in modern spaces of all sizes. 

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

'Deep Shaker Move is a modular retractable system for the top of the island,' say Poliform. 'It can be equipped with shelves and containers, as well as an integrated hood. The upper surface bears the same finish as the top of the kitchen so as to be invisible.'

'This was a stand-out piece at the Salone and was garnering much attention. What we love about this retractable pantry is that its discreet, sleek nature allows you to hide away appliances and clutter, seamlessly,' says Lucy Searle, Editor in Chief of Homes & Gardens. 'When not in use, it fits into the kitchen countertop to create a streamlined finish. At the push of a button, it rises smoothly to make everything you use regularly easily accessible.'

2. Scavolini's cabinetry

Kitchen at Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

Scavolini (opens in new tab) has adapted to reflect a change in tastes and style over the last six decades – but the modern kitchen idea seen above is one of its most notable. Their new kitchen merges masculine lines with whimsical handles (by Venetian designer Luca Nichetto (opens in new tab)) to create the most unlikely but powerful combination of the moment. 

The brand blends raw industrialism with mystical shapes to create cabinetry that makes a statement in homes of every style – and they have our approval. 

'Another element of the kitchen above that stands out is the contrast-lacquered, open cubby shelving. This was a kitchen feature we saw across most of the kitchen brands, though it was notable that the cubbies are used for both practical storage and decorative display,' says Lucy Searle.

'Scavolini is a brand that is always pushing for innovation, whether in cabinetry or technology,' adds Homes & Gardens' Editorial Director, Sarah Spiteri. As well as the playful Nichetto-designed kitchen we loved the new range that features Alexa integration.'

3. Officine Gullo's hand-decorated oven

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

When bespoke kitchen manufacturers meet the Tuscan fashion house Aquazzura (opens in new tab), it’s a match made in design heaven. The result? A gorgeous oven that features a secret garden-inspired design. 

This collaboration invites you to look at Officine Gullo (opens in new tab)’s quintessential cooker in a playful new way – because 2022 is the year you make an artistic statement through your appliances. 

'Each of these pieces is hand-painted, so you will never find two the same,' says Lucy Searle. 'If you look closely, you can even see pencil marks where the artist has made the first sketches. Officine Gullo told me that the interest in this piece has been keen, and that many buyers have asked if they could have theirs custom painted. This is not currently available, but watch this space.'

4. Marazzi's countertops

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

This year we have seen many new, daring kitchen countertop ideas, from glowing, internally-lit marble to the invisible countertop breakthrough. The latest material to enter the conversation comes from Marazzi (opens in new tab), who are experimenting with durable surfaces that replicate the beautiful veins seen in authentic stone. 

The company, best known for its ceramic tiles, also showcased an integrated cooker top that further feeds into the desire for invisible appliances – creating a sleek, clean look that will struggle to fall out of style. 'Marazzi shows just what is possible when working with replica stone, with incredible finishes that really make an impact,' Sarah says. 

'Another element we spotted that contributes further to the streamlined look was cooker controls being integrated into countertops and the front of cabinetry, as below in this kitchen by Steel Cucine (opens in new tab),' Lucy adds. 

Kitchen countertop

(Image credit: Lucy Searle)

5. Cesar Cucine's curves

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

It’s time to rethink your kitchen island ideas and make space for Cesar Cucine (opens in new tab)’s curved offering, as seen below. The unconventional island caught our attention at Salone del Mobile, and it’s easy to see why this statement is so captivating. 

The design above plays with similar circular shapes (including the light fitting and sink) that accentuate the island’s curve and bring an entirely new look to an (already) modern setting. 

Sarah Spiteri spoke to the Cesar Cucine design team who explained that they were 'keen to use soft edges to create a convivial and social kitchen,' in the same way we are all drawn to round dining tables.

'Curves and circles were a real theme at Salone this year, and not just in kitchens,' adds Lucy Searle. 'The newest sofa designs feature incredible curves and silhouettes that soften the square proportions of rooms, and this is a trick that is easily translatable in kitchens.' 

6. Unox Casa's oven

Kitchen trends from Salone del Mobile 2022

(Image credit: Future / Sarah Spiteri)

Unox Casa is establishing itself as a leader in the ultra-high spec oven industry – for a good reason. Their SuperOven (opens in new tab) (above) makes it possible to achieve restaurant-level cuisine in a domestic setting – thanks to its highly-specific pre-programmed functions that make the cooking process feel seamless. 

While its minimalistic design receives points in the interior world, its technological abilities remain hidden, so you can enjoy a powerful oven without tainting your scheme. This oven is certainly worth the investment. 

'What we loved about this – and so much of what we saw at Salone – was the equal attention given to both form and function.'

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Livingetc and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.