Interior Design

How to clean a window without streaks – according to experts

If you're looking how to clean a window without streaks, these expert-approved tips will ensure a spotless finish

How to clean a window without streaks
(Image credit: Jody Stewart)

Knowing how to clean a window may seem like a mundane task, but it is important to give them a quick refresh every once in a while. A spotless window will increase the amount of light in your home – and allow you to make the most of your view. So, where should you begin? 

With these expert window treatment ideas, naturally. This is how to clean a window without streaks, the professional way. 

How to clean a window without streaks

Curtain hanging above the window

(Image credit: Future / James Balston)

For a sparkling, streak-free appearance, window experts at Hillarys recommend starting by removing any curtains or blinds and cleaning them alongside your glass. While this is the first step, it will ultimately leave you with a complete finish. The experts then suggest making a homemade vinegar-based solution that will remove all dirt.  

How to clean windows with vinegar  

white kitchen with windowseat in Edinburgh Georgian townhouse designed by Jessica Buckley

(Image credit: Paul Massey)

'Homemade solutions are great for cleaning windows,' they say. The experts suggest adding three tablespoons of vinegar into a bucket of warm water before mixing the solution. While cleaning with vinegar will emit a strong smell initially, the aroma will fade quickly.

'Always remember to wear rubber gloves when handling chemicals to prevent irritation and drying out your hands,' they add. 

After making the solution, Hillary's experts recommend tackling your window frames first. 'It's important you begin by cleaning your frames, so you don't drip any dirty water on to clean window panes,' they explain. Wiping down your frames with a wet sponge should remove most dirt. However, if they're especially dirty, you can also use a mild detergent. 

Use a Z-shaped motion on your glass panes

A bright glazed extension

(Image credit: James Merrell/Future)

After completing the frames, it's time to tackle the window panes. It is a good idea to fill your spray bottle with your vinegar solution for a seamless application over the glass. 

'Take a microfiber cloth and wipe in a Z-shaped motion to stop the smears and get every little,' they say. However, for more stubborn marks, you may need to dilute a mild detergent into the water.  

Use old newspapers to prevent streaks  

White / gray room by Farrow & Ball

(Image credit: Shadow White No.282 Modern Emulsion Drop Cloth No.283 Estate Eggshell)

'Old newspapers can be your holy grail when it comes to cleaning windows, especially at the end of your window cleaning process,' they share. This texture will remove any grease left over by your solution. However, this cleaning tip will also guarantee the streak-free finish you may desire. 

'Once cleaned, rub crumpled newspaper in circular motions to absorb any leftover cleaning flue and leave your window streak-free,' they explain. 

How to clean windows from the outside 

raised patio with faux marble flooring in front of brick house with french patio doors

(Image credit: Future)

If you're wondering how to clean windows from the outside, the process is similar to your interiors. However, instead of using a vinegar solution, cleaning expert Ray Brosnan suggests that washing up liquid and warm water will do the job. 

'The secret weapon, the scrim' – this is the cloth you want to use to wipe the edge of the windows. The Rendasun Window Cleaning Cloth is similar, and you can buy it on Amazon.

When It comes to the technique used to wash the windows, it's very similar to washing indoors; utilize the indoor cleaning method and be sure to cover the entire section of glass,' Ray adds. 

Now you know how to clean a window without streaks; you can enjoy a light-filled home, entirely taint-free. 

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Homes & Gardens and Livingetc. As a News Writer, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.