Outdoors

Monty Don’s lavender pruning tip will fill your garden with flowers – but you need to act before the end of August

The secret to a Provencal garden is simple, but it involves pruning this weekend

Wildly growing lavender in garden
(Image credit: Future / Adam Wallis)

The allure of lavender needs no explanation, from its southern continental ambiance to its therapeutic healing powers – it is unsurprisingly a staple in gardens worldwide. 

However, while knowing how to grow lavender is a priority for green-thumbed enthusiasts, the question of preserving their glory remains lesser-known. Or at least it was unknown before Monty Don revealed his latest advice. 

The garden expert shared a host of gardening jobs to tackle this August. However, some tips are more time-sensitive than others – and that includes the lavender pruning tip. 

Monty’s advice will prevent ‘woody’ plants and ensure your space remains aromatic for months ahead. But if you haven’t already pruned, then Monty urges you to act before the end of the month. Sharing his expert garden ideas, the BBC Gardener’s World presenter reveals what you need to know. 

Freshly picked lavender in a basket

(Image credit: Future / Alun Callender)

‘To avoid woody, leggy plants, lavender should be pruned every year. The best time to do this is as soon as the flowers start to fade, which, depending on the variety, can be any time between midsummer and the end of August,’ Monty explains in his blog

‘Do not wait for the seed heads to form or the flowers to turn brown as you want to allow the maximum amount of time for regrowth before winter,’ he adds. 

Lavender in a country garden

(Image credit: Future / Polly Eltes )

Knowing the correct time to prune your lavender is one thing, but knowing how to prune is another. Thankfully though, Monty has also shared his cottage garden ideas that will almost promote healthy growth throughout the year ahead.

The secret to success, as Monty suggests, is mastering the cutting technique: 'cut back hard to a good compact shape but be sure to leave some new shoots on each stem – lavender will often not regrow from bare wood,’ Monty instructs. 

He adds that the new shoots will grow quickly and offer an ‘attractive and healthy cover to protect the plant in winter and provide the basis of next year’s display.’ 

Freshly grown lavender

(Image credit: Future / Adam Wallis)

If a flight to Provence remains out of reach at present, then fear not. Monty’s Mediterranean garden idea will enrich your garden with Southern French purples for a long time to come. However, if you haven't already pruned; now is your time.

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc's Homes titles. She has a background in national newspapers in the UK and has experience in fashion and travel journalism, which she previously practised whilst living in Paris and New York City. Her adoration for these fashion capitals means she particularly enjoys writing about upcoming styles and trends for Homes & Gardens. Megan also loves discovering vintage pieces in her spare time, meaning her decor is largely influenced by the beauty of the jazz age.